IOM

Social Media Breaks

This week we would like to focus on taking “social media breaks.” Everyone understands that social media is both a positive and negative source of communication, but most of our society tends to lean on the bad scale of things. Our reliance on social media can have a detrimental effect on our mental health. Furthermore using them too frequently can make you feel increasingly unhappy and isolated in the long run. Becoming more conscious of the amount of time you spend scrolling through other people’s online profiles could help you focus more on yourself and boost your self-confidence. Equally importantly, it helps the individual be more active than reactive. Being more active during your twenty-four hours allows you to achieve your goals in life, and strive on living a successful lifestyle.

Addiction is a big problem on social media and most of this mainly comes from our Notification Center. Like most of us, you would probably benefit from a “digital detox,” a strategy to force you to reduce the amount of time spent on social media. This can be achieved through a few basic steps such as turning off the sound function on your phone, only allowing yourself to check your phone every hour or so, and dedicating periods in the day as self-imposed no-screen time. While there is no permanent way to cure addiction, we must use this tool at our own risk. But what if policymakers, social media operators, employers, researchers, health care providers and educational establishments all played their part in reducing excessive use of social media? Our world may be completely different.

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